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  1. bandit

    A lot of what was done was meta, really, in the early days. Some fanfiction, a LOT of parody, and snippets of pastiche. (It doesn't get called fanfiction until practically the invention of the internet.) There was a burst of it published in the 70s, after "The Seven Percent Solution" made such a big hit. But there was a lot of semi-canonical things out there. Rathbone and Bruce made a whole lot of radio shows, each a case in the style of the Adventures (some of them are actually pretty good.) And some amateur stuff, theatricals and productions. Hell, as far as I'm concerned Baring-Gould's massive work creates as much fanon as it cites canon.

    Look for the chronologies. Watch Watson get invented wives and trips to America. Oh, yes, the fannish urge to fill in the gaps was there all along...

    In 1974, DeWaal wrote the "World Bibliography of Sherlock Holmes" and it was already over 500 pages long, btw, so there's a lot of stuff out there. Try going to the catalog of the Norlin Library at CU Boulder and searching for "Sherlock Holmes". They've got an extensive mystery collection, and there are some titles which would probably be not only of use to you, but also available via ILL.

    Last Edited Thu 06 Nov 2014 10:32PM EST

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    1. Thank goodness I find that I'm already familiar with everything you wrote until the World Bibliography part. It means I'm not completely ignorant after months of research, it's a huge relief for me since my final paper is my first academic work.
      Also I found that in the Baker Street Journal they are pretty attached both to the 7percent and to The Private of SH, but the biggest outburst was definitely when 7percent reached best-seller status as you said.
      Google tells me that CU Boulder is in Colorado? So I think I'll make do with the online equivalent of the catalog because a transatlantic trip doesn't exactly fit my schedule now..
      My professor and I were pondering more over the earliest pastiches and the beginning of the societies for the chapter about the history of SH fandom, so a semi-complete list of fanworks during the 20th century doesn't fall in my line of research as of now... Personally I'd love to but my professor said that it's quite a fit and I should concentrate on what I can manage, which would be some case studies from AO3 to show how and where the fandom is shifting now. But thank you again!

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      1. bandit

        Yes, CU Boulder is Colorado. I actually took a class from DeWaal about the time he was finishing up his bibliography, which is why I know about it. I figured you'd be using the online catalog, too, I just didn't know it was a transatlantic trip! (Have you played with the online information from the Sherlock Holmes Collections at the University of Minnesota yet? That's a trip i'm still planning to make someday!)

        In any case, if I know anything about this fandom it's that it tends to be a lifelong love, so you'll have lots of time to indulge your passions after this paper is done. The meta is almost as much fun as the fic!

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