AO3 News

Post Header

Published:
2019-05-17 14:29:43 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Arly Guevara, who volunteers with the Strategic Planning Committee.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

I work on implementation monitoring, where we try to support other committees in reaching the goals proposed by our current Strategic Plan. In an organization founded by and for fans, it's very important for us to make sure the plan follows the same principles, tailored to our needs so the OTW can keep being a place where we feel safe and validated.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

I meet on Saturdays with the other members of Strategic Planning, and the rest of the week I work on any assignments I might have. If there are any projects where I'm involved, I might meet during the week to work on that.

What made you decide to volunteer?

I saw a post on the main page of the OTW website! I've been a fan of the OTW for many years now so I decided to take part in it. I was also encouraged by the fact that the job description aligned with the things I was learning at Vocational School at the time.

What's the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

I really like working with my teammates! It's great to meet people outside of my home country, learn about their own experiences and points of view. Besides that, it also feels great to be part of an organization I've admired for so long.

What fannish things do you like to do?

I. Read. Fanfiction. A lot of it. I really like to be involved with fanfic writers and be part of discussions/analysis, too. Besides that, I looove attending conventions and I'm trying my hand for the first time in cosplay (though I usually only do characters that have the same hair color as me, sorry, I'm lazy).


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2019-04-21 15:02:35 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Nrandom, who volunteers as a staffer in our Policy & Abuse and Tag Wrangling Committees.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

As a member of the Policy & Abuse Committee, I respond to tickets sent in by users about issues like plagiarism, harassment, non-fanworks (works like prompt lists, fic searches, requests for a beta, or roleplay ads), as well as other violations of the Terms of Service. As a team, we do our best to help users with any issues they have while also ensuring that the values AO3 was founded on are upheld. I also get to do a lot of work with the Accessibility, Design, & Technology Committee (AD&T), particularly in situations like last year, when the archive was experiencing a spam epidemic.

In addition to Policy & Abuse, I volunteer for the Tag Wrangling committee. This involves organising and linking tags together for easier filtering, often working with a team to get everything done. It’s a lot of fun to work with the other wranglers, and it’s always interesting to see how people are tagging their works! I get quite a few fic recommendations from this - my “Marked for Later” list is always substantially longer after a couple of hours spent wrangling. I also serve as a volunteer manager for the Tag Wrangling committee and complete some of the administrative tasks, such as training new wranglers and writing new guidelines and documentation where needed.

In general, I love that I can help the OTW behind the scenes through my work with the Tag Wrangling Committee, but that I also get the chance to work with our wonderful user base as a Policy & Abuse Volunteer.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

When I’m working on things for the OTW, I tend to start curled up in a blanket with a laptop, a cat, and a cup of tea. If I’m working on P&A cases, first I’ll check if there were any updates in my ongoing cases, before perusing the ticket queue and grabbing a few to work on that day. Each case is investigated and weighed equally, regardless of the number of tickets sent in, so we always have plenty to do. The P&A team is very friendly and collaborative, it’s a pleasure to work together to help users and to maintain the archive as a space where creators can post a variety of fanworks.

On days I’m working on wrangling tasks, I check my to-do lists to see if I have any tasks in progress or if there are any I would like to pick up, before choosing a couple of fandoms to work on and opening AO3 to look at new tags. I’m lucky enough to be on teams with other volunteers for some of the fandoms I wrangle, and it’s always fun to chat about everything as we work.

What made you decide to volunteer?

I started volunteering 2 years ago when I saw an advertisement for Tag Wrangling on the AO3 homepage, realised that I had the time, and thought it might be fun to help with the archive I frequented so often. Little did I know what a difference that decision would make in my life today. I’ve met some of my closest friends while volunteering, and have found an amazing fannish community to be a part of. A year ago I joined Policy & Abuse as well, drawn to the committee by the chance to be able to interact with and help users directly. Through that I’ve learned a lot about fandom, but I’ve also had the chance to work with a great team and develop customer service skills.

What's the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

I absolutely love the community of volunteers. In addition to our volunteer work, we often do things together like play games, share recs, and just generally flail about fannish things. I’ve made so many amazing friends.

Before I joined I never really engaged in fandom, but since joining I’ve learned quite a bit about fandom and the people in it. It’s exciting to be a part of a fannish community, and to be able to do my little part in keeping AO3 running.

What fannish things do you like to do?

I’ve always been primarily a reader of fanfic, which is what drew me, like many others, to AO3 in the first place. Some of my frequent fandoms are Harry Potter, Marvel, Yuri!!! On Ice, and Star Wars, but I tend to jump from fandom to fandom quite frequently. I joined fandom in 2013 and have since enjoyed learning about its history, from where a lot of current fandom practices have come about. Recently, I have also started recording podfics and subsequently flailing at fandom friends while editing.


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2019-03-17 15:22:01 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Clark Seanor, who volunteers as a staffer in our Elections Committee.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

Being in the Elections team in general means that you're responsible for the OTW's Board elections running -- and running smoothly. Voting Process Architects, or VPAs, help with the technical side: we investigate (and solve!) issues and make sure that processes are documented.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

In a typical week, I'll set aside some time to work on the tasks my team have distributed amongst ourselves. We're always working toward a goal. Up til recently part of this would have been a weekly team-wide meeting, but we're testing out an asynchronous meeting style to deal with more disparate time zones. So, VPAs meet once a week to discuss what we've done, then we report to the rest of the team and check their reports.

What made you decide to volunteer?

I decided to volunteer because I appreciate the work the OTW does as a whole. Fandom needs its own, not-for-profit spaces to thrive, and AO3 is a big part of that. In truth, the work of other teams is what inspired me to join mine: Accessibility, Design, & Technology for making things work, Legal for advocating for fan issues, wranglers for making the AO3 tag system possible. There are a lot of teams and a lot of people behind the scenes who all form a small part of what we do, and I find that amazing.

What's the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

The most fun thing about volunteering for me is talking to the people I've met through it. I know many people across many teams who I've learned a lot from and even made friends with. Though that isn't what I joined for, it's definitely been a factor in continuing to volunteer!

What fannish things do you like to do?

One of the big things I like to do is cosplay: my favourite ones I've done include Bucky Barnes and Tony Stark from the Marvel Cinematic Universe. The Bucky cosplay had a metallic-looking arm that was my first experience in foam armour, and the Tony cosplay had a 'working' arc reactor. I like the process of building cosplay: you learn something every time you build something new.

I've also built a few models of characters from books and graphic novels I've liked. The one I'm most proud of is still the first one I made -- a figure of the character Chris Shane from Lock In.

I also write a fair amount of fic. Most of it is gen, and most of it is Marvel, though I often write in smaller fandoms for fic exchanges. Fic is important to me because I get to write stories about the characters I love and imagine them in new scenarios. And sometimes other people like what I write too, which is always a good feeling.


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2019-02-24 15:51:43 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Lona, who volunteers as a translator.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

I am a translator, beta, uploader and team coordinator for the Dutch translation team. This way I help make the OTW just a little bit more accessible to the people out there who don't speak English.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

It sounds like a horrible cliché, but there is no such thing as a typical week. I can however let you know a bit more about the way our team works! It starts with receiving the English news source texts that need translating or checking for errors, depending on whether you’re the translator or beta reader for that specific text.

The source text can be very easy and straightforward, but sometimes you’ll be presented with trickier phrases and terms. If it’s a term or phrase that we suspect will get used more often, we’ll discuss it with the team. The interesting thing here is that the Dutch team is a mix of Dutch and Belgian peeps, so opinions on what translations to use sometimes vary wildly. Especially if it’s between two terms that are both technically correct, but one is more ‘Dutch-Dutch’ and the other is more ‘Belgian-Dutch’. Please don’t ask me about ‘Contacteer’.

As a coordinator we (I and my other teammate, who is also a coordinator) try to make the team run as smoothly as possible. To give one example, this means that we plan meetings to discuss new terms and we add the new terms to our language’s “cheatsheet”, which is like our knowledge base or dictionary.

After new terms have been discussed and decided on, and the texts have been translated and checked, we upload the translated documents to the site for the world to see!

What made you decide to volunteer?

That’s a very uninspiring story, I’m afraid. I was a secretary between jobs in 2015 and bored out of my mind. My husband was out of the country during the week and I desperately needed something to do. Something fun. So of course I turned to fic reading and had recently stumbled on the AO3 where a ‘We’re looking for translators’ post caught my eye. I figured ‘Why the heck not, my English and Dutch skills are both decent and I need something to do anyway’ and applied. That’s when I discovered that I really love translating! So much, in fact, that I made it my career by now.

And of course, after becoming a translator it was only a short and slippery slope to also become a volunteer for the Policy & Abuse Committee. The OTW became my home in a very short time.

What’s the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

The people. As much fun as translating is, it really can’t hold a candle to the awesome and great people that make up the OTW. I have never before met so many open minded and fantastic peeps as here. Quite a few of them are no longer just ‘fellow volunteers’ but actual friends. We watch movies and series together, we write fic for each other and together, we discover new fandoms through and with each other.

What fannish things do you like to do?

I love to read and write. I started out with fanfiction in a paper journal in highschool, writing about DragonBall Z. Then I migrated to Fanfiction.net for my Pirates Of The Caribbean stories before I found my place at the AO3 where I write about DragonAge, Teen Wolf and Mystic Messenger.

I’m also a gamer, so you can probably find me behind my computer with my face plastered to the screen as I’m levelling one of my many World of Warcraft characters. Or discovering that the cake is a lie in Portal. Or going after Darkspawn in DragonAge.


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2019-01-20 16:20:54 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Solovei, who volunteers as a staffer in our Tag Wrangling Committee.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

Tag Wrangling volunteers make sure that readers can find the works they're looking for, while also being able to tag their works however they want! We've seen just about every variation of a ship name you can think of. Usually with tagging systems, it's either a free-for-all or a strict set of allowed tags, and Ao3 has somehow managed to find a very interesting medium in between those two! I think the tagging system on Ao3 is amazing - I have yet to see something like this work anywhere else.

On top of my regular wrangling work, I am also a Tag Wrangling staffer, which means I do a lot of the administrative tasks that are required for other wranglers to do their work: everything from looking at incoming applications, scheduling and conducting training and regular check-ins, to processing hiatus and retirement requests.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

It really varies! Tag Wrangling opens up recruitment several times a year, and those are usually busy periods for staff. The tags themselves go through phases, with fic exchanges and events usually happening around the holidays. I really enjoy my work, so sometimes I'll sit down intending to only wrangle for a little bit and then realize that several hours have passed!

What made you decide to volunteer?

The year was 2015. I had just finished my Master's in Library and Information Studies and was having trouble finding work, so I needed something to occupy my brain during the job search slog. I had gotten back into writing fanfic some months before after being too busy for it for a few years, when I saw that the OTW had opened applications for tag wrangling. I really loved cataloging and information management classes in library school, so this seemed like the perfect thing to satisfy my love for fiddly organization and make use of some obscure fandom knowledge.

What’s the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

The other volunteers! I honestly cannot imagine what my life would be like if the OTW suddenly wasn't a part of it anymore. I've met some truly wonderful people as a result of my volunteer work (both online and in person). It's also great to have a built-in community of people who are are willing to listen when I want to flail about some new fandom I've gotten into!

What fannish things do you like to do?

I primarily read and write fanfic, though these days it seems that my to-read list is just getting longer and longer... I've been writing fic since the mid 2000's, so I've been in fandom for a while! I also used to participate in roleplaying communities on LiveJournal, and I've been known to make an OTP fanmix or two. My fandoms are many and far-ranging, from obscure webcomics to very popular video games and anime. A friend had recently introduced me to Star Trek, so I'm diving into that fandom headfirst.


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2018-12-29 16:25:53 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Angel who volunteers as a co-chair for the Communications Committee.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

I have been one of two chair-track staffers (CTS) for the Communications Committee. The CTS position is for people who are in training to lead committees. While we're learning we take on other roles in the committee, so in Communications than means helping our chair get information circulated, both within the OTW and to our followers. It could also mean posting news items for our projects, sending out the OTW newsletter, or managing its social media accounts.

What made you decide to volunteer as a chair-track staffer?

I wanted to be involved in the organisation in some fashion and felt my background as a business journalist, and now a full-time fiction writer, gave me a good mix of skills that might be of use. I have flexible time since I work for myself, so I'm able to sort of float around at odd times which can come in handy. I applied for the Chair Track Staffer because I felt it was a good place to use some of those skills -- and to learn more about the organisation and how it operates.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

There are usually two to three meetings with Janita, our chair, and Jess our other chair-track staffer -- Janita calls Jess and I her 'mini-mes'. We respond to any questions from the public or within the organisation, prepare posts for social media, work on campaign notifications and posts with our Elections Committee, and help other committees who need our help. We keep a close eye on social media and on posts to see if we can offer any support, and if we can't answer questions that are sent to us we find out who it would be best to send them to.

What's the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

Being involved. That sounds kind of odd, I know, but seriously how many organisations do you know where memes, fan fiction, fan art, and pop culture in general are a part of every meeting, because they're a normal part of the organisational structure? Where else do you get to fly your fan flag (say that fast five times) high and proud as part of your job?

What fannish things do you like to do?

I'm a hard core Supernatural fan -- #teamDeanbutSamcurious -- and have a growing collection of commissioned fan art and adore SPN fan fiction. I'm in the last few months of preparing my Masters thesis on the impact of fan fiction on the Supernatural source text and creators -- so a lot of my research time is spent either watching SPN or reading SPN fics. Dirty job... Last year I met John Barrowman and his husband Scott Gill which was the highlight of my year (John smelled awesome, Scott was lovely). Mostly I just embarrass my adult children by squeeing at inappropriate moments.


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2018-11-08 17:47:24 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Ariana, who volunteers a staffer in our Accessibility, Design, & Technology Committee and as the Senior Technical Staffer in our Open Doors Committee.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

As a volunteer coder for both Accessibility, Design, & Technology Committee (AD&T) and Open Doors, I mainly help with the OTW's aim of preserving fan history. In my twenty-odd years of online fandom, I've seen many works and sites disappears and it's very satisfying to be able to do my bit to ensure that this happens less frequently in future.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

Because I have both children and a full-time job, I have to fit my OTW duties in around my "real" life. As a general rule, I will spend several hours at the weekend and at least one or two hours in the evening working on OTW projects, as well as attending the weekly meeting for AD&T and, when I can, the Open Doors one which is a bit late in my timezone.

Fortunately, as I'm a software developer in real life too, I can also sometimes sneak in code reviews, research, or a bit of coding at work without anyone thinking it odd -- as long as I remember not to actually open the Archive or any of the sites Open Doors is importing! Conveniently, we use a lot of the same tools at work too, including the messaging app used by the OTW, which means I'm able to keep in touch with other volunteers to ask or answer questions and keep track of any major projects we're working on.

Have you recently worked on any particularly interesting or challenging projects?

My main focus over the last couple of years has been to create a sustainable pipeline to import archives rescued by Open Doors into the Archive. This has involved adding a mass import API to the Archive and a generic website that Open Doors can use to feed external data into it. There are also a set of scripts that adapt the contents of the rescued archives to the format needed by the generic website. The main challenge now is how to process the variety of old archives with those scripts; since every site is different, importing each one is still a lot of work and we've recently recruited more technical volunteers to help with this. The aim is to make importing archives as painless as possible so we can provide a home to all the sites whose owners ask us to add them to the Archive.

What's the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

Perhaps the most useful thing about volunteering for the OTW has been learning software engineering; when I started out as an AD&T coder six years ago, I only knew a bit of theory and some HTML, and now I'm a Principal Software Engineer for a big multinational company!

In a way that's been fun for me, too, because I love computing, but I think to be honest that the most fun aspect of volunteering has been meeting the people I volunteer with. Over the last few years, I've made a lot of friends, some of whom I even meet in real life on a regular basis! It's great to be able to share anything with a group of people who, though they are scattered across the globe, tend to share my fannish, geeky and open-minded views on things.

What fannish things do you like to do?

When I can squeeze a bit of free time, I love to write stories. Most are quite short, but every few years, I'll embark on something long and rambly: my current WIP is over 100,000 words and has been going for nearly two years now! I've always enjoyed making up stories in my head and imagining how the characters from some book or TV show might behave in a given situation. Thanks to the feedback of various betas over the years, I've improved a lot as a writer -- rather as I've improved as a coder!


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment

Post Header

Published:
2018-10-07 15:30:29 UTC
Tags:

Five Things an OTW Volunteer Said

Every month or so the OTW will be doing a Q&A with one of its volunteers about their experiences in the organization. The posts express each volunteer's personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. Today's post is with Lex deLeon, who volunteers as a Support staffer and tag wrangler, and was recently elected to the OTW's Board of Directors.

How does what you do as a volunteer fit into what the OTW does?

As a member of the Support and Tag Wrangling teams, I feel I provide two different aspects of user to volunteer interaction with the Archive. As a tag wrangler, I take loose ideas that people use to describe their stories in the Character, Relationship or Additional Tags fields on their works and make them synonymous with common tags that many people use for searching. There are far too many examples for this, but it is basically like taking fandom ideas and making them make sense to someone who isn't in fandom. The thought process can be the same at times! There can be a lot of research associated with this, especially when someone likes to use fanon specific nicknames. It is a largely invisible, but invaluable task.

As a member of the Support team, I reply to tickets that are sent in by users of the site. This may be as simple as "I can't log in", which is a common complaint to any site with login capability. Those of you out there who have suffered this, you are not alone! Or it could be more complex questions, such as "how do I post a new work". It is always important to me to respond with the utmost of professionalism and respect, as I was once one of those users who didn't know a slash (/) from an ampersand (&). Hint: the first means a romantic or sexual relationship, the second means friendship or platonic.

Overall, I feel my work in the OTW is something that allows me to contribute in a generally positive way to the larger fandom communities that are out there.

What is a typical week like for you as a volunteer?

Generally, any work as a volunteer starts the same way -- caffeine. I will openly admit to being a thorough and unashamed addict, whether it be coffee or energy drinks. Then I will typically peruse new tags that have come in and send them to the appropriate locations as needed. On Support days, I will begin by selecting a ticket which I am comfortable tackling given my level of energy or time -- if a ticket is one which I know will require an hour of research or time, I will not begin working on it when I have ten minutes free. Much of my work as a volunteer is essentially time and resource (read: my own energy levels) management.

My father taught me a crucial lesson as a child: the only normal day was yesterday. Being willing and able to accept this kind of variability has been a huge help to my work as a volunteer.

What made you decide to volunteer?

I had wanted to volunteer for a while but had never happened upon the application at the right time. One day, I came to the Archive to peruse new femslash and saw it -- a shining beacon of a new News post, heralding "Volunteers needed!" I applied and the rest, as they say, was history. The mission of the OTW at large aligns with what I believe we as a fannish culture at large should be striving for -- not just a space for us to post out stories and pictures and videos, but a place that actively strives to protect our rights to do so.

What's the most fun thing to you about volunteering for the OTW?

Of all of the things I have learned and experienced during my time volunteering, the most rewarding thing has been discovering that I am not alone. I am not the only one who sees this rare ship, I am not the only one who sees the need for this fight, and I am not the only one who thinks that Certain Female Characters Were Robbed! While this is something I have also received from my other friends who do not volunteer, it is not always easy to yell into the void of my own fannish tumblr. I wish to discuss these things, to work out my thoughts and find a cohesive narrative from the frequently broken and half baked ideas that we are presented with from canon. The friendships I have made, and the relationships I have forged are ones which I hope are ones which stay with me for a long time.

Other than that, I'd have to say learning about new fandoms. I have SO MANY NEW SHIPS.

What fannish things do you like to do?

I have been writing since roughly 1992, though almost all of my early work is gone. I have never stopped writing, though I have taken hiatuses over the years for personal reasons. I have spent countless hours perusing fan manipulations, fan mixes, fan vids -- but my heart remains with fanfic. Whether reading or writing, that is where my main focus has always been.

I've drifted between fandoms over the years -- oh, the fond memories I have of the long dead Popular mailing list! -- though I do have to admit all of my fandoms have one thing in common. It is a failing, perhaps, or a strength. All of my fandoms have invariably been femslash. It has become a running joke amongst my friends, though additionally an advertisement, that I will invariably know of or be in the fandom for a lot of fandoms that have femslash.

Of everything I do in fandom, remembering what has come before and continuing to work toward allowing others the space and freedom to explore their own fannish tendencies is the thing I am most proud of. It is akin to the classic quote frequently misattributed to Voltaire but which is from Evelyn Beatrice Hall: "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it."


Now that our volunteer’s said five things about what they do, it’s your turn to ask one more thing! Feel free to ask about their work in comments. Or if you'd like, you can check out earlier Five Things posts.

The Organization for Transformative Works is the non-profit parent organization of multiple projects including Archive of Our Own, Fanlore, Open Doors, Transformative Works and Cultures, and OTW Legal Advocacy. We are a fan run, entirely donor-supported organization staffed by volunteers. Find out more about us on our website.

Comment


Pages Navigation